Category Archives: Documents

Third meeting – London

These are the photographs taken during the third workshop at Iniva and the Tagore Centre, London, March 2014. Photos by Ho, Yu, Sheng and Carla Cruz.

photo of Andrea Phillips during third workshop, Iniva

Kodwo Eshun, Andrea Phillips and Grant Watson, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

research group at Iniva

photo by Carla Cruz

photo of Eona McCallum, Shanay Jhaveri and Wendelien van Oldenborgh, third workshop, Iniva

Eona McCallum, Shanay Jhaveri and Wendelien van Oldenborgh, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

Kodwo Eshun, Wendelien van Oldenborgh and Grant Watson, third workshop, Iniva

Kodwo Eshun, Wendelien van Oldenborgh and Grant Watson, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

Adrian Rifkin, Andreas Mueller and Antje Weitzel, third workshop, Iniva

Adrian Rifkin, Andreas Mueller and Antje Weitzel, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

photo of book by Tagore publish in Dutch

photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

photo of room at Tagore Centre, London

Tagore Centre, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

photo of room, Tagore Centre, London

Tagore Centre, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

Otolith Group example of a wall paper design, photo by Ho, Yu Sheng

group photo of Tagore's research group

Research Group, photo by Ho, Yu-Sheng

 

final discussion, Santiniketan

On the group’s research and the ideas each one encountered and revisited in the visit to Santiniketan, January-February 2014.

With: Anshuman Dasgupta, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Andrea Phillips, Anjalika Sagar, and Grant Watson.

on Nandalal Bose and the campus aestethics

Anshuman Dasgupta talks about mural tradition in India, K. G. Subramanian Mastermoshai Studio mural and Nandalal Bose Campus Aesthetics that derives from the surroundings.

K-G-Subramanyan Mastermoshai Studio Mural detail

K-G-Subramanyan Mastermoshai Studio Mural detail, courtesy of Anshuman Dasgupta

on subramanian

Anshuman Dasgupta Talks about Subramanian’s new mural made with glaze paint on tiles and based the technique of collage.

K.G. Subramanyan, Mastermoshai Studio Mural,

K.G. Subramanyan, Mastermoshai Studio Mural, photo by Eona McCallum

K. G. Subramanyan, Mastermoshai Studio, Mural,

K. G. Subramanyan, Mastermoshai Studio, Mural, courtesy of Anshuman Dasgupta

on Life on Campus

Anshuman Dasgupta talks about the mural Life on Campus by Indian artist Benodebahari, at Cheena Bhavana, first floor, freco secco, 1942. Santiniketan, second workshop, 2014.

IMG_7443_w

Wendelien van Oldenborgh shows her photo of Life on Campus Mural at the third workshop, photo by Carla Cruz

Natasha Ginwala talks about Rabindranath Tagore’s Play, the Post Office

Korczak (film 1990: directed by Wajda Wojtek Pszoniak as Korczak with the children of the ghetto.

Korczak (film 1990: directed by Wajda Wojtek Pszoniak as Korczak with the children of the ghetto. The Tagore Centre Uk 1996

Read the play here

Ginwala talks about the translations of The Post Office in Poland. Tagore, however, was never in Poland. The reception of his play is beyond him as figure. The Post Office was read as an anti-Fascist narrative. Janusz Korczak making the play with orphan children from the Jewish Ghetto in Warsaw during the second worlds war. Later made into a film by Andrzej Wajda. Implication of death through the script becomes manifest in the film.

Kodwo Eshun reads Tagore’s Japan Lecture


Excerpt of the 1916 Japan a Lecture, Delivered for the Students of the Private Colleges of Tokyo and the Members of the Indo-Japanese Association, at the Keio Gijuku University.

At first, I had my doubts. I thought that I might not be able to see Japan, as she is herself, but should have to be content to see the Japan that takes an acrobatic pride in violently appearing as something else. On my first arrival in this country, when I looked out from the balcony of a house on the hillside, the town of Kobe,—that huge mass of corrugated iron roofs,—appeared to me like a dragon, with glistening scales, basking in the sun, after having devoured a large slice of the living flesh of the earth. This dragon did not belong to the mythology of the past, but of the present; and with its iron mask it tried to look real to the children of the age,—real as the majestic rocks on the shore, as the epic rhythm of the sea-waves.

Read the full text

Kodwo Eshun reads a 1916 lecture from Tagore. Evocation of the roots of Kobe as Dragon. In the letter the traveler the person that brings a specific optic. Kodwo Eshun talks about reception, misgivings and curiosity.