Tag Archives: Rabindranath Tagore

Last Passage of Rabindranath Tagore’s Speech at Berlin’s Friedrich Wilhelm University

[PDF] Last Passage of Rabindranath Tagore’s Speech at Berlin’s Friedrich Wilhelm University (Today’s Humboldt University), on 1st June 1921.

Transcript from the recording of the speech. Used by Rustom Bharucha in his lecture at Iniva, June 2014.

“India holds sacred and counts as places of pilgrimage, all spots which display a special beauty or splendour of nature. The Himālayas of India are sacred and the Vindhya hills. Her majestic rivers are sacred. Lake Mānasa and the confluence of the Ganges and the Yamunā are sacred. India has saturated with her voice and worship the great nature with which her children are surrounded, whose light fills their eyes with gladness, and whose water cleanses them, whose food gives them life, and from whose majestic mystery comes forth constant declaration of the infinite in music, scent, and colour, bringing awakening to their souls. India gains the world through worship, through communion of soul. (…)”

Tagore, Pedagogy and Contemporary Visual Cultures a Collective Bibliography

[PDF] Tagore, Pedagogy and Contemporary Visual Cultures a Collective Bibliography

Rustom Bharucha’s public talks

Postmortem: Terror and Performance6 June, 5pm ⎪ Goldsmiths College, Small Cinema – RHB 185 Introduced by Andrea Phillips  Followed by a reception to launch Terror and Performance by Rustom Bharucha (Routledge, May 2014).

Performing ‘Asia’: The Affective Affinities of Rabindranath Tagore and Okakura Tenshin 7 June, 3pm – 5pm Iniva, 1 Rivington Place  Introduced by Grant Watson £7 (£5 concessions)

Rustom Bharucha, Iniva June 2014

Rustom Bharucha, Iniva June 2014, photo by Carla Cruz

Performance theorist Rustom Bharucha delivers a lecture on his unique research into the friendship between the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore and Japanese curator Okakura Tenshin. This talk is part of research project Tagore, Pedagogy and Contemporary Visual Cultures, a partnership between Iniva and Goldsmiths, University of London, which looks at Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore’s legacy in relation to cultural translation, curatorship, education, and historical precedent.

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