Category Archives: Documents

Last Passage of Rabindranath Tagore’s Speech at Berlin’s Friedrich Wilhelm University

[PDF] Last Passage of Rabindranath Tagore’s Speech at Berlin’s Friedrich Wilhelm University (Today’s Humboldt University), on 1st June 1921.

Transcript from the recording of the speech. Used by Rustom Bharucha in his lecture at Iniva, June 2014.

“India holds sacred and counts as places of pilgrimage, all spots which display a special beauty or splendour of nature. The Himālayas of India are sacred and the Vindhya hills. Her majestic rivers are sacred. Lake Mānasa and the confluence of the Ganges and the Yamunā are sacred. India has saturated with her voice and worship the great nature with which her children are surrounded, whose light fills their eyes with gladness, and whose water cleanses them, whose food gives them life, and from whose majestic mystery comes forth constant declaration of the infinite in music, scent, and colour, bringing awakening to their souls. India gains the world through worship, through communion of soul. (…)”

Tagore, Pedagogy and Contemporary Visual Cultures a Collective Bibliography

[PDF] Tagore, Pedagogy and Contemporary Visual Cultures a Collective Bibliography

The Sexologist and the Poet: On Magnus Hirschfeld, Rabindranath Tagore, and the Critique of Sexual Binarity

[PDF] The Sexologist and the Poet: On Magnus Hirschfeld, Rabindranath Tagore, and the Critique of Sexual Binarity by J. Edgar Bauer.

‘Between 1930 and 1932, German-Jewish sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) undertook a world journey that he eventually reported in Die Weltreise eines Sexualforschers (1933), arguably the first non-Eurocentric, anti-colonialist critique of Asian cultures from a sexological perspective. Saluted as “the modern Vatsyayana of the West,” Hirschfeld met during his stay in India personalities such as Jawaharlal Nehru, Jagadish Chandra Bose, and Radindranath Tagore, whom he visited at his family residence in Calcutta. Against the backdrop of Hirschfeld’s “doctrine of sexual intermediaries” and his general postulate that truly creative artists have mostly “united in themselves both sexes in especially pronounced form,” the study analyzes and assesses his reference to Tagore’s femininity. While acknowledging the correspondences between the sexologist’s universalization of sexual intermediariness and the poet’s premise that “[t]he Creator must be conscious of both the male and female principles without which there can be no Creation,” the elaborations focus on their divergent conceptualizations of sexual difference, womanhood, and the erotic life.’

Tagore’s Post Office pictures by Winfried Mateyka

Landings, NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin, photo by Winfried Mateyka

Landings installation, NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin

Landings, NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin

Landings 'Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition', NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin

Landings, NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin

Landings, NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin

Landings, NGBK Berlin

Landings ‘Dakghar: Notes Towards Isolation and Recognition’, NGBK Berlin

Macuga, NGBK Berlin

Foreground: Goshka Macuga ‘When Was Modernism?’, NGBK Berlin

Otolith Group, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group’s ‘A Century Before Us’, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group’s A Century Before Us’, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group’s ‘A Century Before Us’, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group, NGBK, Berlin

Otolith Group’s ‘A Century Before Us’, NGBK, Berlin

Leela Ghandi’s Talk at Practice International

See Leela Ghandi’s talk at Practice International’s website, on the intersections between her research and PI concerns. Notions of self-work, global ethical consciousness, hospitality, cosmopolitanism and others are discussed.

For the intersections between Leela Ghandi’s thought and this research network’s discussions see notes from workshop 3 and workshop 4.

Elzbieta Walter on the translations of Tagore’s Post Office to Polish

Public talk by Elzbieta Walter introduced and chaired by Landings (Natasha Ginwala and Vivian Ziherl):

Despite the fact that Tagore never visited Poland, he is no doubt the only Indian writer whose writings have been extensively translated into Polish. The play Dakghar (The Post Office) has been translated into Polish five times by different translators. It was also staged several times. One of the most significant staging was conducted during the Second World War in Poland in Jewish Orphans’ Home in the Warsaw ghetto run by Janusz Korczak. Janusz Korczak was the pen name of Henryk Goldszmit (1878/79-1942), a Polish-Jewish educator, physician, children’s author and essayist. He organized a staging of Dakghar with the children of the orphanage just few weeks before several of them and he were deported to the concentration camp of Treblinka.

Elzbieta Walter is a Tagore scholar and literary theorist based in Poland, and an alumnus of Santiniketan.